poet

Hazel Hall

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Hazel Hall

Hazel Hall was born in Saint Paul, Minnesota, in 1886. She published three books of poetry during her career: Curtains, Walkers, and Cry of Time. She was much-loved in her lifelong home state of Oregon; the Oregon Book Award is named jointly for Hall and poet William Stafford. Hall died in Portland, Oregon, in 1924. 

by this poet

poem

Here are old things:
Fraying edges,
Ravelling threads;
And here are scraps of new goods,
Needles and thread,
An expectant thimble,
A pair of silver-toothed scissors.
Thimble on a finger,
New thread through an eye;
Needle, do not linger,
Hurry as you ply.
If you

poem
I am less of myself and more of the sun;
The beat of life is wearing me
To an incomplete oblivion,
Yet not to the certain dignity
Of death. They cannot even die
Who have not lived.

                                The hungry jaws
Of space snap at my unlearned eye,
And time tears in my flesh like claws.
poem

I have known hours built like cities,
House on grey house, with streets between
That lead to straggling roads and trail off,
Forgotten in a field of green;

Hours made like mountains lifting
White crests out of the fog and rain,
And woven of forbidden music—
Hours eternal in their