poet

Alfred Kreymborg

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Alfred Kreymborg
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Alfred Kreymborg was born on December 10, 1883, in New York City. The son of a cigar-store owner, he attended public school in Manhattan and became a chess phenomenon by the age of ten. Along with chess, he was very interested in music, and his desire to compose eventually led him to writing.

He began writing poetry in his late teens and soon became an active figure in the Greenwich Village literary circles. The first writer to be involved with Alfred Stieglitz’s 291 gallery, he joined forces with the avant-garde photographer Man Ray in 1913 to create The Glebe, a Modernist journal that published writers such as H. D., Ezra Pound, and William Carlos Williams. When Man Ray started an artist’s colony in Ridgefield, New Jersey, that same year, Kreymborg joined. From Ridgefield, he founded Others: A Magazine of the New Verse with Skipwith Cannell, Wallace Stevens, and William Carlos Williams in 1915.

Also in 1915, Guido Bruno published Kreymborg’s first work, Edna: The Girl of the Street (Bruno’s Weekly), a fictional account of an encounter with a prostitute. This publication led to Bruno’s arrest on obscenity charges and attracted wider literary attention for Kreymborg.

His first book of poetry, Mushrooms: A Book of Free Forms (John Marshall, 1916), established him as one of the early adopters of free verse. He went on to author over a dozen more poetry collections, including The Selected Poems, 1912­–1944 (E. P. Dutton, 1945) and No More War and Other Poems (Bookman Associates, 1950). In addition, he published an autobiography, Troubadour (Boni and Liveright, 1925), as well as several puppet and radio plays, most famously Lima Beans (S. French, 1925).  He also wrote Our Singing Strength: An Outline of American Poetry, 1620-1930 (Coward-McCann, 1929), a history of American poetry that provides valuable insight into the Modernist circles.

Kreymborg also edited the prominent Modernist magazine Broom, An International Magazine of the Arts and founded the anthology series American Caravan with Paul Rosenfeld. He died on August 14, 1966.


Selected Bibliography

Poetry
No More War and Other Poems (Bookman Associates, 1950)
The Selected Poems, 1912–1944 (E. P. Dutton, 1945)
Mushrooms: A Book of Free Forms (John Marshall, 1916)

Prose
Troubadour (Boni and Liveright, 1925)
Our Singing Strength: An Outline of American Poetry, 16201930 (Coward-McCann, 1929)

by this poet

poem

The pantaloons are dancing,
dancing, through the night,
pure white pantaloons,
underneath the moon,
on a jolly wash line,
skipping from my room,
over to Miranda,
who washed them this noon.

poem

The snow,
ah yes, ah yes indeed,
is white and beautiful, white and beautiful,
verily beautiful –
from my window.
The sea,
ah yes, ah yes indeed,
is green and alluring, green and alluring,
verily alluring –
from the shore.
Love, ah yes, ah yes, ah yes indeed,

poem

Wind:
Why do you play
that long beautiful adagio,
that archaic air,
to-night
Will it never end?
Or is it the beginning,
some prelude you seek?

Is it a tale you strum?
Yesterday, yesterday—
Have you no more for us?

Wind:
Play on.
There is