Recorded for Poem-a-Day, January 7, 2019.
About this Poem 

“About ten years ago, I was traveling in Mexico with two lovers of mine as our time together was nearing its inevitable conclusion. This poem, which is part of a longer narrative series that I started in my chapbook Flower Wars, explores my sense of dislocation within that experience and within the memory itself; the imprint left behind that is both acute and incomplete. The title of the poem is borrowed from a section of Roberto Bolaño's The Savage Detectives and the embedded epigraph is a line from Eileen Myles's Chelsea Girls.”
—Nico Amador

Mexicans Lost in Mexico

it was summer and time circled itself like a swarm of gnats  

	
                                     like the pink-topped taxis rounding the 
                                            glorieta  

	
	   if only for the sake of inertia, 
			             we were standing in a foreign desert


the days of the week slid by, uncapitalized


	    my grandfather forever trapped in the picture 
			             where he pretends to play the guitar


a serenade for tourists and lovers with new rules between them


		        our occupation: to look and not touch


at some point we could no longer tell if it was the clouds we were looking at 
		        or the building reflecting the clouds


				                 all epigraphs came pre-assigned


the beautiful thing about this story was that it happened


		         we didn’t see the floating gardens 
					                      and I don’t remember the art  

		
only the symmetry of a blue wall, a momentary breeze


			            there were parrots, I think, or peacocks?  

				
				               there were birds

Copyright © 2019 by Nico Amador. Originally published in Poem-a-Day on January 7, 2019, by the Academy of American Poets.

Copyright © 2019 by Nico Amador. Originally published in Poem-a-Day on January 7, 2019, by the Academy of American Poets.

Nico Amador

Nico Amador

Nico Amador is the author of Flower Wars (Newfound Press, 2017), selected as the winner of the Anzaldúa Poetry Prize.